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Physical Health of California

Share Health Data


California Senate Bill No. 1419 was enacted to adopt application programming interface (API) requirements outlined in existing Federal regulations. The rule makes it easier for you to access and share your health data. For example, use your smart phone app to find out about claims, medications and more. This shared data is found with certain insurance plans. Apps can get information starting from 2016. The year the applications can start collecting health data is based on when the member enrolled in their current plan. Why share data between the member, health care providers and the apps? It helps everyone work together to improve patient care. This may help reduce the memberís health care costs, too. You can add an API Personal Representative that can share your health data with a third-party app. You can add a person of your choice as an API Personal Representative or if there are other members on your plan, you can make them an API Personal Representative. You can remove the API Personal Representative at any time.

Member Education


Beginning in 2024, you can ask your former health plan to send your health information to your current health plan. You can take all your information with you as you move from plan to plan. Having your health information in one place will improve decision-making, care, and health outcomes.

Privacy Protections


We will not release your health information to health plans without your permission. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) is a federal privacy law that protects health information. It limits how your health information is accessed, stored, and shared. HIPAA protects health information exchanged between health plans.

Third-Party App Guide


Protect your health information. This is information about you and your health. Your privacy is important. Third-party apps may collect your health information. Third-party means the app is not ours. The app is not working for us. Make sure you understand your apps. Read their privacy policies. Choose apps with strong privacy and security.

You should know:
  • What health information the app will collect
  • What other information the app will collect
  • If your identity will be stored
  • If and how the app will use your information
  • If and how the app will share your information
  • Why and with whom the app will share your information.
  • If the app will sell your information
  • If and how the app will let you know about changes to its policies
  • If and how you can limit the appís use of your information
  • If and how the app protects your information
  • How using this app could affect others, such as your family
  • If and how you can see your information and correct any mistakes
  • How to send complaints to the app
  • How to delete your account or information
  • If and how you can stop the app from seeing or using your information
  • If and how the app will let you know if there is a security breach

Sensitive Health Information

You must first allow us to send health plans sensitive health information about:
  • Substance use disorder
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Psychotherapy
  • Reproductive health
  • Communicable disease
  • Other sensitive health information
We will not release this information to apps without your permission.

Privacy Protections

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) is a federal privacy law that protects health information. It limits how information is stored and shared.
  • It protects information in apps that are from health plans or health care providers.
  • It does not protect information in apps that are not from health plans or health care providers.
  • All apps are subject to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Act. It protects against unfair or deceptive acts. An example is if an app shares your information after saying it wonít.

Complaints

If you believe an app has improperly used your information:

Authorization for API Personal Representative